There Needs to be a Walk-In Cooler and Freezer Certification Program

The Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) warns that the new walk-in cooler and freezer law could hurt manufacturers. The problem with the new law is that there is no enforcement mechanism built in, so a non-compliant company can manufacture walk-ins using their same old inferior panels and methods and beat compliant manufactures on price.

To address this issue, AHRI is launching an initiative to educate distributors, installers, and equipment owners about the new standard and its requirements. The association has developed a simple checklist that installers and equipment owners can use to make sure the walk-in cooler or freezer being specified or installed complies with federal law.

In addition to customer education, manufacturers believe the solution is the development of a certification program for walk-in coolers and freezers that would clearly identify those units that have been independently tested to verify they achieve a federally established minimum performance rating.

AHRI said the federal government is working with industry to develop a testing methodology for this equipment by 2010. In addition, a final rule is expected to be adopted in January 2012 that will establish a performance-based standard.

The full article can be found here.

Don’t let this happen to your cooler

KNOXVILLE (WATE) — Knox County health inspectors were forced to temporarily close a North Knoxville deli this week over a walk-in cooler that was way too warm.

When the inspector found the walk-in refrigerator at 60 degrees and not working properly, she ordered a lot of food thrown away including ham, turkey, meatballs, pepperoni, bacon, eggs, and cheese.

Nearly 100 pounds of food were ordered thrown away because they weren’t safe to eat. Garelli’s was closed until the refrigerator was repaired.

Plus, the inspector found a roach crawling on the kitchen floor. Garelli’s pest control company was ordered to pay a visit.

Maybe the roach was attracted to the moldy grapes, celery and rotten tomatoes the inspector found in the refrigerator.

Mold was also found in the ice machine and water was leaking onto the kitchen floor.

Garelli’s is open again.

Here are some tips to help you pass your restaurant inspection.

Make sure your walk-in has insulation that will retain it’s r-value well over time. And always make sure your refrigeration unit is functioning properly.

Standard Nominals

Many of our potential customers may be needing a custom sized or custom designed walk-in cooler or freezer to fit their specific needs. For custom orders find a salesperson.

But those of you who don’t require a custom size can choose to buy from our selection of standard nominals through one of our authorized dealers. (find on in your area by typing in your zip code in the form below)

Enter Zip:

Sizes Include:

6′ X 6′ X 7′ 6″ Nominal (5′ 10 1/2″ X 5′ 10 1/2″ X 7′ 6″ Actual Size)

6′ X 8′ X 7′ 6″ Nominal (5′ 10 1/2″ X 7′ 10″ X 7′ 6″ Actual)

8′ X 8′ X 7′ 6″ Nominal (7′ 10″ X 7′ 10″ & 7′ 6″ Actual)

8′ X 10′ X 7′ 6″ Nominal (7′ 10″ X 9′ 9 1/2″ & 7′ 6″ Actual)

Options:

Cooler (with or without floor), Freezer (with floor)

Refrigeration:

For Indoor boxes – no refrigeration, indoor remote ref, outdoor remote ref, top mount ref, saddle mount ref (cooler only), penthouse ref

For Outdoor boxes- no refrigeration, outdoor remote ref

8x10cooler

Walk-in Cooler Maintenance Tips

Maintaining your walk-in coolers and freezers is pretty simple. For starters, a clean walk-in is an efficient one. Your staff is likely are trained to keep both the interior and exterior clean and sanitary (use a mild soap detergent and damp mop), but key components can sometimes be overlooked. Pay particular attention to:

Door gaskets. Keep clean and pliable. Replace when worn.

Hinges and door closers. Check regularly for proper opening.

Condenser and fan. Keep clean and free of grease so they can do a more effective job of transferring heat. Since most of you will use remote refrigeration systems, that will mean a trip up to the roof for someone on a regular basis.

Condenser and drain lines. Keep them clear and schedule checks of the seals where they enter the building.

Beyond checking these areas, it makes sense to schedule servicing every three months if your system is self-contained and every six months if it’s remote.

These tips come from the February 2009 issue of Foodservice Equipment Magazine. Find the full article here. The article also details the new government EISA rules and new innovations in walk-in component technology from glass doors to compressors.

Meeting 2009 EISA Walk-in Cooler & Freezer Standards

The federal government’s EISA (Energy Independence & Security Act) standards went into effect Jan. 1st, 2009. This act was intended to improve energy efficiency within the refrigeration industry as well as many other industries. AHRI reports there have been some concerns since there are no enforcement mechanism or standard testing methods built into the act; non-compliant walk-in manufacturers will stand to benefit. These manufacturers will be able to beat compliant competitors on price (due to the lower input costs of their non-regulation walk-ins). Be sure that when buying a walk-in, you check to make sure they are EISA compliant.

The AHRI (Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute) is trying to raise awareness about what this act mandates among distributors, installers, and consumers. They have created a checklist of the standards walk-in coolers & freezers are required to meet that can be found at ACHR The News. Use this checklist to ensure the walk-in unit you are about to purchase meets the EISA standards.